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The Not-So Great Outdoors

by Brady Krauss (2019-06-07)


In her debut as both illustrator and author, Madeline Kloepper depicts the story of a reluctant city kid facing the prospect of a family camping trip with a huge amount of skepticism and reluctance. The narrator, clearly attached to her diverse, urban neighborhood, can’t imagine enjoying herself without electricity, street musicians, fountains or sculptures. “It’s not like there’s anything out here,” she gripes.

The magic in The Not-So Great Outdoors is the juxtaposition of the narrator’s words against Kloepper’s richly imagined wild landscapes, replete with running streams, plants, songbirds and, of course, bears. As the story proceeds, we see the girl, who is part of a mixed-race family, beginning to open up and see the wonders before her. There may not be city lights, but there are stars. And while there are no playgrounds, there are logs to cross and caves to explore.

The Not-So Great Outdoors is also a reminder of the simple pleasures of family camping—toasting marshmallows, going for walks, cooking on a camp stove and fishing. The book is clearly a labor of love for Kloepper, and with its simple, tongue-in-cheek text and gorgeous artwork, it’s the perfect picture book to help prepare those (perhaps reluctant) future campers in your life.

In her debut as both illustrator and author, Madeline Kloepper depicts the story of a reluctant city kid facing the prospect of a family camping trip with a huge amount of skepticism and reluctance. The narrator, clearly attached to her diverse, urban neighborhood, can’t imagine enjoying herself without electricity, street musicians, fountains or sculptures. “It’s not like there’s anything out here,” she gripes.

The magic in The Not-So Great Outdoors is the juxtaposition of the narrator’s words against Kloepper’s richly imagined wild landscapes, replete with running streams, plants, songbirds and, of course, bears. As the story proceeds, we see the girl, who is part of a mixed-race family, beginning to open up and see the wonders before her. There may not be city lights, but there are stars. And while there are no playgrounds, there are logs to cross and caves to explore.

The Not-So Great Outdoors is also a reminder of the simple pleasures of family camping—toasting marshmallows, going for walks, cooking on a camp stove and fishing. The book is clearly a labor of love for Kloepper, and with its simple, tongue-in-cheek text and gorgeous artwork, it’s the perfect picture book to help prepare those (perhaps reluctant) future campers in your life.

In her debut as both illustrator and author, Madeline Kloepper depicts the story of a reluctant city kid facing the prospect of a family camping trip with a huge amount of skepticism and reluctance. The narrator, clearly attached to her diverse, urban neighborhood, can’t imagine enjoying herself without electricity, street musicians, fountains or sculptures. “It’s not like there’s anything out here,” she gripes.

The magic in The Not-So Great Outdoors is the juxtaposition of the narrator’s words against Kloepper’s richly imagined wild landscapes, replete with running streams, plants, songbirds and, of course, bears. As the story proceeds, we see the girl, who is part of a mixed-race family, beginning to open up and see the wonders before her. There may not be city lights, but there are stars. And while there are no playgrounds, there are logs to cross and caves to explore.

The Not-So Great Outdoors is also a reminder of the simple pleasures of family camping—toasting marshmallows, going for walks, cooking on a camp stove and fishing. The book is clearly a labor of love for Kloepper, and with its simple, tongue-in-cheek text and gorgeous artwork, it’s the perfect picture book to help prepare those (perhaps reluctant) future campers in your life.

In her debut as both illustrator and author, Madeline Kloepper depicts the story of a reluctant city kid facing the prospect of a family camping trip with a huge amount of skepticism and reluctance. The narrator, clearly attached to her diverse, urban neighborhood, can’t imagine enjoying herself without electricity, street musicians, fountains or sculptures. “It’s not like there’s anything out here,” she gripes.

The magic in The Not-So Great Outdoors is the juxtaposition of the narrator’s words against Kloepper’s richly imagined wild landscapes, replete with running streams, plants, songbirds and, of course, bears. As the story proceeds, we see the girl, who is part of a mixed-race family, beginning to open up and see the wonders before her. There may not be city lights, but there are stars. And while there are no playgrounds, there are logs to cross and caves to explore.

The Not-So Great Outdoors is also a reminder of the simple pleasures of family camping—toasting marshmallows, going for walks, cooking on a camp stove and fishing. The book is clearly a labor of love for Kloepper, and with its simple, tongue-in-cheek text and gorgeous artwork, it’s the perfect picture book to help prepare those (perhaps reluctant) future campers in your life.

In her debut as both illustrator and author, Madeline Kloepper depicts the story of a reluctant city kid facing the prospect of a family camping trip with a huge amount of skepticism and reluctance. The narrator, clearly attached to her diverse, urban neighborhood, can’t imagine enjoying herself without electricity, street musicians, fountains or sculptures. “It’s not like there’s anything out here,” she gripes.

The magic in The Not-So Great Outdoors is the juxtaposition of the narrator’s words against Kloepper’s richly imagined wild landscapes, replete with running streams, plants, songbirds and, of course, bears. As the story proceeds, we see the girl, who is part of a mixed-race family, beginning to open up and see the wonders before her. There may not be city lights, but there are stars. And while there are no playgrounds, there are logs to cross and caves to explore.

The Not-So Great Outdoors is also a reminder of the simple pleasures of family camping—toasting marshmallows, going for walks, cooking on a camp stove and fishing. The book is clearly a labor of love for Kloepper, and with its simple, tongue-in-cheek text and gorgeous artwork, it’s the perfect picture book to help prepare those (perhaps reluctant) future campers in your life.

In her debut as both illustrator and author, Madeline Kloepper depicts the story of a reluctant city kid facing the prospect of a family camping trip with a huge amount of skepticism and reluctance. The narrator, clearly attached to her diverse, urban neighborhood, can’t imagine enjoying herself without electricity, street musicians, fountains or sculptures. “It’s not like there’s anything out here,” she gripes.

The magic in The Not-So Great Outdoors is the juxtaposition of the narrator’s words against Kloepper’s richly imagined wild landscapes, replete with running streams, plants, songbirds and, of course, bears. As the story proceeds, we see the girl, who is part of a mixed-race family, beginning to open up and see the wonders before her. There may not be city lights, but there are stars. And while there are no playgrounds, there are logs to cross and caves to explore.

The Not-So Great Outdoors is also a reminder of the simple pleasures of family camping—toasting marshmallows, going for walks, cooking on a camp stove and fishing. The book is clearly a labor of love for Kloepper, and with its simple, tongue-in-cheek text and gorgeous artwork, it’s the perfect picture book to help prepare those (perhaps reluctant) future campers in your life.

In her debut as both illustrator and author, Madeline Kloepper depicts the story of a reluctant city kid facing the prospect of a family camping trip with a huge amount of skepticism and reluctance. The narrator, clearly attached to her diverse, urban neighborhood, can’t imagine enjoying herself without electricity, street musicians, fountains or sculptures. “It’s not like there’s anything out here,” she gripes.

The magic in The Not-So Great Outdoors is the juxtaposition of the narrator’s words against Kloepper’s richly imagined wild landscapes, replete with running streams, plants, songbirds and, of course, bears. As the story proceeds, we see the girl, who is part of a mixed-race family, beginning to open up and see the wonders before her. There may not be city lights, but there are stars. And while there are no playgrounds, there are logs to cross and caves to explore.

The Not-So Great Outdoors is also a reminder of the simple pleasures of family camping—toasting marshmallows, going for walks, cooking on a camp stove and fishing. The book is clearly a labor of love for Kloepper, and with its simple, tongue-in-cheek text and gorgeous artwork, it’s the perfect picture book to help prepare those (perhaps reluctant) future campers in your life.

In her debut as both illustrator and author, Madeline Kloepper depicts the story of a reluctant city kid facing the prospect of a family camping trip with a huge amount of skepticism and reluctance. The narrator, clearly attached to her diverse, urban neighborhood, can’t imagine enjoying herself without electricity, street musicians, fountains or sculptures. “It’s not like there’s anything out here,” she gripes.

The magic in The Not-So Great Outdoors is the juxtaposition of the narrator’s words against Kloepper’s richly imagined wild landscapes, replete with running streams, plants, songbirds and, of course, bears. As the story proceeds, we see the girl, who is part of a mixed-race family, beginning to open up and see the wonders before her. There may not be city lights, but there are stars. And while there are no playgrounds, there are logs to cross and caves to explore.

The Not-So Great Outdoors is also a reminder of the simple pleasures of family camping—toasting marshmallows, going for walks, cooking on a camp stove and fishing. The book is clearly a labor of love for Kloepper, and with its simple, tongue-in-cheek text and gorgeous artwork, it’s the perfect picture book to help prepare those (perhaps reluctant) future campers in your life.

In her debut as both illustrator and author, Madeline Kloepper depicts the story of a reluctant city kid facing the prospect of a family camping trip with a huge amount of skepticism and reluctance. The narrator, clearly attached to her diverse, urban neighborhood, can’t imagine enjoying herself without electricity, street musicians, fountains or sculptures. “It’s not like there’s anything out here,” she gripes.

The magic in The Not-So Great Outdoors is the juxtaposition of the narrator’s words against Kloepper’s richly imagined wild landscapes, replete with running streams, plants, songbirds and, of course, bears. As the story proceeds, we see the girl, who is part of a mixed-race family, beginning to open up and see the wonders before her. There may not be city lights, but there are stars. And while there are no playgrounds, there are logs to cross and caves to explore.

The Not-So Great Outdoors is also a reminder of the simple pleasures of family camping—toasting marshmallows, going for walks, cooking on a camp stove and fishing. The book is clearly a labor of love for Kloepper, and with its simple, tongue-in-cheek text and gorgeous artwork, it’s the perfect picture book to help prepare those (perhaps reluctant) future campers in your life.

In her debut as both illustrator and author, Madeline Kloepper depicts the story of a reluctant city kid facing the prospect of a family camping trip with a huge amount of skepticism and reluctance. The narrator, clearly attached to her diverse, urban neighborhood, can’t imagine enjoying herself without electricity, street musicians, fountains or sculptures. “It’s not like there’s anything out here,” she gripes.

The magic in The Not-So Great Outdoors is the juxtaposition of the narrator’s words against Kloepper’s richly imagined wild landscapes, replete with running streams, plants, songbirds and, of course, bears. As the story proceeds, we see the girl, who is part of a mixed-race family, beginning to open up and see the wonders before her. There may not be city lights, but there are stars. And while there are no playgrounds, there are logs to cross and caves to explore.

The Not-So Great Outdoors is also a reminder of the simple pleasures of family camping—toasting marshmallows, going for walks, cooking on a camp stove and fishing. The book is clearly a labor of love for Kloepper, and with its simple, tongue-in-cheek text and gorgeous artwork, it’s the perfect picture book to help prepare those (perhaps reluctant) future campers in your life.

In her debut as both illustrator and author, Madeline Kloepper depicts the story of a reluctant city kid facing the prospect of a family camping trip with a huge amount of skepticism and reluctance. The narrator, clearly attached to her diverse, urban neighborhood, can’t imagine enjoying herself without electricity, street musicians, fountains or sculptures. “It’s not like there’s anything out here,” she gripes.

The magic in The Not-So Great Outdoors is the juxtaposition of the narrator’s words against Kloepper’s richly imagined wild landscapes, replete with running streams, plants, songbirds and, of course, bears. As the story proceeds, we see the girl, who is part of a mixed-race family, beginning to open up and see the wonders before her. There may not be city lights, but there are stars. And while there are no playgrounds, there are logs to cross and caves to explore.

The Not-So Great Outdoors is also a reminder of the simple pleasures of family camping—toasting marshmallows, going for walks, cooking on a camp stove and fishing. The book is clearly a labor of love for Kloepper, and with its simple, tongue-in-cheek text and gorgeous artwork, it’s the perfect picture book to help prepare those (perhaps reluctant) future campers in your life.

In her debut as both illustrator and author, Madeline Kloepper depicts the story of a reluctant city kid facing the prospect of a family camping trip with a huge amount of skepticism and reluctance. The narrator, clearly attached to her diverse, urban neighborhood, can’t imagine enjoying herself without electricity, street musicians, fountains or sculptures. “It’s not like there’s anything out here,” she gripes.

The magic in The Not-So Great Outdoors is the juxtaposition of the narrator’s words against Kloepper’s richly imagined wild landscapes, replete with running streams, plants, songbirds and, of course, bears. As the story proceeds, we see the girl, who is part of a mixed-race family, beginning to open up and see the wonders before her. There may not be city lights, but there are stars. And while there are no playgrounds, there are logs to cross and caves to explore.

The Not-So Great Outdoors is also a reminder of the simple pleasures of family camping—toasting marshmallows, going for walks, cooking on a camp stove and fishing. The book is clearly a labor of love for Kloepper, and with its simple, tongue-in-cheek text and gorgeous artwork, it’s the perfect picture book to help prepare those (perhaps reluctant) future campers in your life.

In her debut as both illustrator and author, Madeline Kloepper depicts the story of a reluctant city kid facing the prospect of a family camping trip with a huge amount of skepticism and reluctance. The narrator, clearly attached to her diverse, urban neighborhood, can’t imagine enjoying herself without electricity, street musicians, fountains or sculptures. “It’s not like there’s anything out here,” she gripes.

The magic in The Not-So Great Outdoors is the juxtaposition of the narrator’s words against Kloepper’s richly imagined wild landscapes, replete with running streams, plants, songbirds and, of course, bears. As the story proceeds, we see the girl, who is part of a mixed-race family, beginning to open up and see the wonders before her. There may not be city lights, but there are stars. And while there are no playgrounds, there are logs to cross and caves to explore.

The Not-So Great Outdoors is also a reminder of the simple pleasures of family camping—toasting marshmallows, going for walks, cooking on a camp stove and fishing. The book is clearly a labor of love for Kloepper, and with its simple, tongue-in-cheek text and gorgeous artwork, it’s the perfect picture book to help prepare those (perhaps reluctant) future campers in your life.

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